How We Handle Fees

When the threat of a government taking of your property appears likely, your financial future may be threatened. You need the help of an attorney to protect your interests but may be concerned about the costs.

The Odom Firm understands your concerns and wants help. We have nearly 100 years of combined experience in eminent domain cases, and we only represent landowners, not the government. We are committed to protecting your financial interests.

How Much Does the Initial Consultation Cost?

We offer free consultations for eminent domain matters. This gives you the opportunity to meet us, get information about your situation and then determine, without risk, whether it makes sense for you to work with The Odom Firm.

How Do We Handle Fees?

There are no up-front costs, expenses or legal fees. We work on a contingency fee basis. A contingency fee means that an attorney receives a percentage of the amount recovered. If we are not successful in getting you more money than you were initially offered, we will not be entitled to an attorney fee. This allows you to pursue your right to request additional money, while protecting you from the risk of having to pay attorney fees' if no recovery is obtained over the government's initial offer.

Do I Still Get the Money that I was Initially Offered?

Yes. If you hire us, we can file a Motion for Disbursement of Deposit requesting the Court to enter an Order Disbursing the Deposit. After obtaining the signed Order, the clerk's office will disburse the funds from your initial offer.

Learn More

We invite you to learn more about our firm, our practice areas, and our team, and to contact us to discuss your case.

News

Nov
19
Click "Read more" to view the video. Read More
Oct
15
Attorney David Murray obtained a decision from the Mecklenburg County Superior Court reversing a City of Charlotte Zoning Board of Adjustment (“ZBA”) decision which found his client in violation of the City of Charlotte Zoning Ordinance for its o… Read More
Oct
1
Attorney David Murray applied his knowledge of property law and land valuation to obtain a 1.7 million dollar settlement for his clients against a developer who he believed was violating the restrictive covenants on and around the landowners’ p… Read More
Apr
16
Eminent domain is the government’s power to take private land for public use. This power stems from the Fifth Amendment to the Constitution, so although it may seem like the government is overreaching when it tries to take your land, this right… Read More
Apr
10
Your land is yours — or so you thought. Then you received a letter from the government informing you that it is taking your land through the power of eminent domain to expand an airport, for a public utilities project, or some other use. Your first… Read More